Category Archives: Twitter

Context Matters

A timely reminder to never underestimate:

  1. the importance of context
  2. the power of media technologies to misconstrue intent

(One does hope the Duke and Duchess don’t mind being used in this instructive context)

 

Twitter changes explained

Since the return of founder Jack Dorsey as CEO in 2015, Twitter has reclaimed its engineering roots.

Not surprisingly, platform change has been afoot.

Over the past couple of months, Twitter has:

  • added the feature ‘poll your community’ – a nifty little tool enabling you to write a research poll (from the comfort of your twitter app) and send it out into the Twitterverse for feedback – something this user has done on several occasions with variant degrees of success.
  • Introduced .GIF search courtesy of partners at GIPHY and Riffsy
  • integrated Periscope into tweets so that you can enjoy live broadcasts.

In the coming months, more changes are rolling out all thanks to the fact, Twitter have redefined the 140 characters limit.

A little history here might be helpful…

The 140 character limit of tweets exists, because in 2006 when Biz, Jack & Co. were building the platform, SMS messages were limited to 140 characters.

It was a known standard.

Throughout the last decade the 140 standard has been exactly that – an acceptable and much loved limit to engaging on Twitter.

As an avid user of the platform for the past six years, both personally and professionally, I’ve always found Twitter as a great way to #connect, #Engage and #Participate with community members.

Professionally, I’ve been an avid user of Twitter to mentor both my undergrad and postgrad students.

It was a great way to maintain a dialogue with keen students throughout the semester while avoiding the essay-esque emails of panic around assessment and exam time.

It was a great way of teaching media and communications students how to edit and sub-edit without losing impact and intent.

It was a great research tool, news gathering tool – it was a great tool for educating communications student how to, research, engage and communicate with community.

Here’s what will and will not be considered a character in a tweet:

  • @ – twitterhandles will not be counted as characters. This is great news if your twitter handle is loooooong, now people might start tweeting you 🙂
  • Media attachments (URLs, photos, GIFs, polls) will not take up valuable character spacing, so you now have more room to say what you want to say.
  • the .@ convention has gone – THANK GOODNESS! This convention was just plain ugly! Instead, the power of the Retweet returns for both you and your community members. If you start a tweet with a @username then your tweet will be broadcast to all your followers.
  • RT – and if you want to broadcast a tweet more broadly, then you now are able to retweet your own tweets.

Twitter_May24

 

 

 

Social Tech and Pro Sports: When Fans Turn Ugly

Social Technology enables access: to the good and the down right ugly of fandom.

A friend, who is new to the Twitterverse sent a copy of this tweet to me today via email, with his proposed Twitter response…

What I saw was great Twitter-quette from @Mark_Sanchez an athlete I’d never heard of prior to this morn (NFL’s not exactly front page of the sports section down here in Oz).

What my friend saw (and was subsequently outraged by) was a mean fan.

Now his proposed response was everything you’d expect from someone not yet immune to the unfiltered exchanges that permeate the Twittersphere.

It was terse, it was pure exasperation and it was just as emotional as it tarred all mankind (and of course the Great Lord above) with a lack of intelligent design to engage with Mr Sanchez in this way.

This was fandom, flamed.

The Twitterverse, as a study platform for understanding the motivations and machinations of human behaviour and communication, is at it’s most simple: a crowded sphere of opinion and sentiment.

And my friend certainly had his!

Although what he also had was time. Not through choice, but because he needed guidance on how to use the technology to respond.

My instructions to him were simple:
– Reduce your text to 140 characters using Twi-language
– Search for the original tweet in player’s twitter feed and ‘link to’ it using a right click
– Remember: the best thing to do in communicating (through Twitter) is not to be emotional

I also told him: think of your professional online profile. I knew that would stop him into consideration.

I explained: Twitter is searchable and given the nature of his proposed response (inclusion of a not overly glowing reference to God) was likely to provide a little more than a spark of its own.

I questioned whether the Twitterverse in this instance, was actually the best place for him to be defending his atheism by doing a little flaming of his own…?

Not surprisingly, his preferred course of action was a non response. He ‘let it go through to the end goal’ (you know what I mean…!) so to speak.

While it is Twitter’s dynamism that enables the global masses, it’s non regulation is both its beauty and its beast.

Knowing how to best respond really comes back to a question of self regulation and ultimately, control.

So what is the correct thing to do when you see someone, a sporting hero, celebrity, or friend attacked in the Twittersphere?

Do you jump in and claim the space of ‘having their back’…? OR can you report the ‘flamer’ to the authorities for being mean?

Sadly, Bullying doesn’t stop in the school yard. Some people continue the practice well into and throughout their ‘adult’ life as well.

The rules of engagement (with professional athletes) in the Twittersphere is also a blurred social space now… especially if the athlete manages their own account (which IMHO I think they should… but only if they are mature enough to self regulate, manage through their emotions and act professionally at any given hour)

I remember when my brother was playing for the Sydney City Roosters, his captain Brad ‘Freddy’ Fitler, jumped the perimeter at the Sydney Football Stadium during the game and went after a fan who as it turned out, had thrown a cash register roll onto the field which hit my brother in the head and knocked him out cold as the Roosters stood huddled in goal.

Now ‘Freddy’ reacted instinctively and made a bee line for the perpetrator of the assault, but by the time he’d ascend the stadium steps, grabbed the 19 year old responsible, he’d either cooled down enough or heeded the advice of surrounding security and police on hand to stifle a response.

Now a professional footballer’s instinct on Twitter is no different. However, this is not as easy to do when the distance or space and time, between a Twitter event and response is muted by the prevelance of smartphone technologies…

Because it’s here where space and time morphs into one.

The ability to STOP, wait, think and breathe through the options available (respond / don’t respond) really makes all the difference in EVERYONE’s (not just the professional athlete’s) management of communications (with fans and colleagues).

There is not a person alive who wouldn’t be offended if they had been the intended recipient of the Sanchez tweet.

On the other hand, there isn’t a decent human being who would read this and not think it’s author, gutless for cloaking their bullying under the cyber cape of anonymity.

As I said to my friend, why engage with someone who won’t even tell you their real name, let alone someone who wishes pain and injury to a 26 year old pro footballer who is just doing his job and under pressure to perform no less (yes, I did my research) with rookie Geno Smith pushing for selection this preseason.

Professional footballers don’t need anyone to tell them when they’re not playing well. However, ridicule for a bad day at the office (or even a good one) is sadly the nature of invested interests or fans who live for a result.

What I do know, is that whatever the 2013-2014 season holds for Sanchez on-field, in the Twittersphere he is leading by example.

And in Australia, #NRL #ARU #AFL #FFA could well take note.

Forget the rest: OREO take out Super Bowl 2013 Ad of the season

Forget the rest: OREO take out Super Bowl 2013 Ad of the season

Only minutes after a post Beyonce power failure sent half the stadium into pitch darkness and the Ravens and 49ers back to the dressing sheds, the clever kids at Oreo tweeted this advertising gem.

Oreos Super Bowl 2013 tweet

Contextually relevant marketing communications – what’s not to love?

Awkward Social Media Moments

Relax. We all have them.

Awkward Social Media Moments (ASMM) are inevitable.

Especially, when most of us can only stumble around the 17 year old web (the World Wide Web was commercialised in 1995) as toddlers, or tweens at best.

Facebook is a social utility (just like gas and water?) that enables people to connect with friends (strong ties), strangers (weak ties) and everyone else ‘online’ who dares.

Unlike my current utilities providers, Facebook is constantly refining its product and service offering to community members via ‘new releases’ or user interface updates.

Most of us turn a blind eye and deaf ear to these changes. That is until we notice a new tab, or that our profile looks different and we can’t find that short cut button or right click where we use to.

So we grumble and moan for a post or two, but then continue with our daily business online unperturbed.

However, with the increased frequency of user interface updates of high-use and high profile online platforms, like facebook, come increased opportunities for ASMM, TAT’s (Troll Attacks on Twitter) and moments of SMR (Social Media Remorse).

Such was my experience recently…

The other day, a friend posted a video of his daughter on a swing. I made a comment on what I thought was his wall, however, I inadvertedly reposted his video onto mine.

I’m still not sure how I did it, but when I eventually realised what I’d done (a couple of days later!) = #AwkwardSocialMediaMoment.

You see, I’ve never met this particular child and there was no ‘reason’ to share the family movie to a wider audience. Thus my repost, simply didn’t make sense.

Not surprisingly, I facebook messaged my friend and apologised, explaining what and how it had transpired.

He’s a lovely guy and I’ve known him for over a decade, but is someone I see infrequently (beyond Facebook).

I knew (hoped) he’d be understanding (which he was). But this Awkward Social Media Moment (ASMM) got me thinking…

  1. What is the impact of strong/ weak ties (social capital) in resolving/ minimising potential conflicts via misunderstanding in this pseudo-private Facebook environment?
  2. How often do user interface upgrades impact public communications/ interactions in social media communities?
  3. What is the scope for and impact of misinterpretation in ASMM?

This is especially interesting for me (Governance), given neither novices or seasoned users (who are usually guiding individuals, brands and businesses) are immune to being ‘caught’ by tech changes.

So thinking practically, how can you manage/ resolve / insulate the individual, team, brand or business?

In looking at possible (plausible) practical solutions, does a communications (control) system need to be introduced (beyond the charter and legal obligations of big business) to better educate / update online users? Will this satisfy any potential breeches of both private,  personal and public communications? Is the current system enough? What is the current system? #WatchThisSpace.

For the moment, I’m still comfortable with my original hypothesis pertaining to the bastardisation of the word ‘expert’:

There is no such thing as a social media expert.

While some of us are a little more knowledgeable in this space than the majority (probably because we also ‘live’ online), beyond the clever souls who create the actual social technology platforms, online, as in life, everyone makes mistakes – some inevitable, most avoidable.

Either way, at the end of the day, ALL ASMM are an opportunity for learning.

So, get up, dust yourself off, learn from your failures and keep practicing The Art of Social! 🙂

To Follow or Not to Follow: Which Twit? Is the Question…

Twitter’s 2000 follow limit encourages us all to proactively manage our ‘followers’ and dedicated Twitter lists.

My modus operandi goes something like this: You pique my interest, for whatever reason, I’ll follow you. 🙂

My follow back policy is equally straight forward: You follow me, I #FB (that’s ‘Follow Back’ for the uninitiated).

Why? Well, because… in the Twitterverse,

1. EVERYONE has a public profile and no one ‘Twit’ is more important than the other. (Unless of course you’re a Belieber, then the rules of the game change completely and turn a late teen into a deity! But that’s a whole new discussion thread)

2. A ‘follow’ represents a turn in time. Someone has taken the time to follow me, so I can take a moment out of my tightly scheduled day to return the compliment.

3. An extended network of associates encourages opportunities for learning, teaching, business and insights into what constitutes the art of conversation.

4. I tend to ‘unfollow’ the passive aggressive sales Twit and spambots with ninja-like efficiency.

5. I generally give individuals, teams and organisations a week (maybe two) to follow back, after which I generally unfollow and file them into my Twitter lists. (Recent changes to the use of Twitter’s #’s has made following/ creating # community conversations a little more challenging without paying for the privilege)

6. At the moment, I do respond to DM’s. This might change when I start receiving a thousand a day, however, for the moment I find DM a really efficient and effective communications tool. -Actually I prefer it to email which is so old school! 🙂

There are however, some exceptions to my follow back rules:

1. Although I can swear like a losing Rugby World Cup final coach at half-time, I don’t condone the use of foul language in public. So if you have a penchant for acronyms such as F.u.c.k or referring to women as ‘ho’s or *itches (you get my drift), thank you for your follow, however, I won’t be following you back.

2. Likewise if you promote cruelty to children, animals or individuals based on colour, race or creed, once again, thank you for your follow, however, I won’t be following you back.

This is how I roll on #Twitter atm. It’s entirely up 2U if U want 2 cyber roll with me or not.

Either way, I hope your face aches from smiling all day today and everyday.

xo

Future Social Government, Canberra, Australia

The last time I spoke about sport and social media, Black Caviar provided the living breathing example of how great sports brands can tweet.

Today, Quade Cooper’s weekend tweets provided a great example of twi-versations that occur during an employer/ employee divide.

Noone likes an unhappy workplace, however, two tweets can say a lot about a person and a company.

While ‘toxic’ may be an apt description of any organisational approach that uses traditional media management methodologies to ‘manage’ it’s new media relations…

The reality is, social technologies require a socialised approach to communications.

Irrespective of whether the organisation is using them or not,the employee is, and in Cooper’s case, actually leveraging the technology the way it was intended.

Could this be the ‘nudge’ Australian Rugby needs to finally heed the call and develop a comprehensive governance framework (think widely distributed social media guidelines, policy and contracts) for their employees both on and off the pitch around social technologies..? Let’s hope so.

Why? Because if Quade Cooper leaves rugby, he’ll also take over 580,000 Twitter ‘followers’ with him, and that’s just stating the bleeding obvious. #FoodForThought

IBR Conference ‘Web 3.0 Investigating the future of social media: 2012 Forum

Here are the slides from my recent presentation at the International Business Review Conference: ‘Web 3.0 Investigating the future of social media: 2012 Forum’ at The Sofitel Wentworth, Sydney, Australia.

My fellow Day One presenters included: Alex Brown of Virgin Media (UK), Simon Townsend of Deloitte, Rod McGuiness of the ABC and Sean Herron of NASA (USA).

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