Category Archives: Social Technology

To Follow or Not to Follow: Which Twit? Is the Question…

Twitter’s 2000 follow limit encourages us all to proactively manage our ‘followers’ and dedicated Twitter lists.

My modus operandi goes something like this: You pique my interest, for whatever reason, I’ll follow you. πŸ™‚

My follow back policy is equally straight forward: You follow me, I #FB (that’s ‘Follow Back’ for the uninitiated).

Why? Well, because… in the Twitterverse,

1. EVERYONE has a public profile and no one ‘Twit’ is more important than the other. (Unless of course you’re a Belieber, then the rules of the game change completely and turn a late teen into a deity! But that’s a whole new discussion thread)

2. A ‘follow’ represents a turn in time. Someone has taken the time to follow me, so I can take a moment out of my tightly scheduled day to return the compliment.

3. An extended network of associates encourages opportunities for learning, teaching, business and insights into what constitutes the art of conversation.

4. I tend to ‘unfollow’ the passive aggressive sales Twit and spambots with ninja-like efficiency.

5. I generally give individuals, teams and organisations a week (maybe two) to follow back, after which I generally unfollow and file them into my Twitter lists. (Recent changes to the use of Twitter’s #’s has made following/ creating # community conversations a little more challenging without paying for the privilege)

6. At the moment, I do respond to DM’s. This might change when I start receiving a thousand a day, however, for the moment I find DM a really efficient and effective communications tool. -Actually I prefer it to email which is so old school! πŸ™‚

There are however, some exceptions to my follow back rules:

1. Although I can swear like a losing Rugby World Cup final coach at half-time, I don’t condone the use of foul language in public. So if you have a penchant for acronyms such as F.u.c.k or referring to women as ‘ho’s or *itches (you get my drift), thank you for your follow, however, I won’t be following you back.

2. Likewise if you promote cruelty to children, animals or individuals based on colour, race or creed, once again, thank you for your follow, however, I won’t be following you back.

This is how I roll on #Twitter atm. It’s entirely up 2U if U want 2 cyber roll with me or not.

Either way, I hope your face aches from smiling all day today and everyday.

xo

Future Social Government, Canberra, Australia

The last time I spoke about sport and social media, Black Caviar provided the living breathing example of how great sports brands can tweet.

Today, Quade Cooper’s weekend tweets provided a great example of twi-versations that occur during an employer/ employee divide.

Noone likes an unhappy workplace, however, two tweets can say a lot about a person and a company.

While ‘toxic’ may be an apt description of any organisational approach that uses traditional media management methodologies to ‘manage’ it’s new media relations…

The reality is, social technologies require a socialised approach to communications.

Irrespective of whether the organisation is using them or not,the employee is, and in Cooper’s case, actually leveraging the technology the way it was intended.

Could this be the ‘nudge’ Australian Rugby needs to finally heed the call and develop a comprehensive governance framework (think widely distributed social media guidelines, policy and contracts) for their employees both on and off the pitch around social technologies..? Let’s hope so.

Why? Because if Quade Cooper leaves rugby, he’ll also take over 580,000 Twitter ‘followers’ with him, and that’s just stating the bleeding obvious. #FoodForThought

IBR Conference ‘Web 3.0 Investigating the future of social media: 2012 Forum

Here are the slides from my recent presentation at the International Business Review Conference: ‘Web 3.0 Investigating the future of social media: 2012 Forum’ at The Sofitel Wentworth, Sydney, Australia.

My fellow Day One presenters included: Alex Brown of Virgin Media (UK), Simon Townsend of Deloitte, Rod McGuiness of the ABC and Sean Herron of NASA (USA).

Cybermedicine Symposia

Following an invitation from Clinical director and obstetrician to the rugby stars, Dr Vijay Roach, I recently presented a lecture on social media and medicine at the Northern Clinical School, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney Australia.

Here are a copy of the slides presented


As always, please don’t hesitate to contact me, should you have any questions.

Long Lost Blog

Hello everyone,
Apologies if you have felt neglected, however, I decided to take a well-earned and extended break from my research over the Christmas/ New Year period; a by-product of which was no posting or blogging! πŸ™‚
Now that I am back and refreshed, rest assured I will be blogging frequently about my current, future and past research.
So looking forward to another great academic year xo

Knowledge Production: A Social Process

Jacques Derrida claims that the process of writing is fundamentally changed by the way we write. Marshall McLuhan on the other hand points to the medium as ‘the message’, while German sociologist Niklas Luhmann opines ‘man is not able to communicate; only communication is able to communicate’. Three different men, three different opinions. Nothing new about that. Or is there?

Academics define, debate and redefine modern society as it is, or how we as individuals interact with it continuously. Put into a 2010 context, does technology impact the content, delivery or consumption of content and if so how?

How has the process of knowledge production changed with the advent of social media? More specifically, what are the epistemic consequences of social software and information architecture?

WOH! Hang on! What the hec is social software?

Social software enables group interaction. A conduit to conversation. So information architecture must be the mechanics of delivery, yes? Well kind of…

Okay, so accepting the structure of things has changed, how have our conversations changed specifically? And by that I mean, how has our production of knowledge evolved?

From blackboards in lecture halls to death by powerpoint in the boardroom (or classroom!) to Skyping across timezones, the physical space and time of our conversations has evolved through and because of social media capability.

Blogs (just like this one!) and the rise of Wiki’s sees the distribution of information and access to knowledge evolved both the classification of information (Luhmann), the way we engage with it and the dissemination process of information as knowledge beyond our local sphere.

McLuhan, Foucault and friends are a lot more accessible via youtube.com, wikipedia and the likes for the academic in training. And we know that what we see and read we need to take with a grain of salt (production and knowledge values are not expert) however, the entree to access is invaluable.

Schiltz, Truyen and Coppens(2007) in their article, Cutting the trees of knowledge: Social Software, Information Architecture and their epistemic consequences discuss how the nature of what is known seems to be changing. They use the example of a Linux expert and the expectations around what that in fact means. No longer is it assumed that the ‘expert’ contains all knowledge personally (‘in his head’), although it is assumed that s/he has direct access to it, either via a social/ professional network or both.

Social networking systems and applications are changing the way we gather, store, disseminate and create knowledge. Aggregated suites of software such as Facebook.com and myspace.com are pervasive.

Why is it important in our production of knowledge again?

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=10032646&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=1&color=&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0
Social Media from Phil Guest on Vimeo.

The fundamental shift in communications practices is inter-related to the social network of the modern-day information society for which one way or another we can (and do! – Australian’s are some of the largest consumers of social media in the world) democratically ENGAGE.

Social Media: Hype or Communications Revolution?

No matter who I am speaking with, everyone wants to know about social media and how to best use it for their business.

The most frightening thing for me is the inflexibility from business owners and senior management teams. Used to throwing money at marketing and sales activities, this group of learned corporates expect this new media channel to fit within the existing consumer consumption paradigm. But it doesn’t.

Now, I could lie to any corporate waving a cheque in my direction and tell them that social media is where they need to be and that I can brand them up to Koo-ee… if I was that way inclined, but I’m not.

Quite possibly to my fiscal detriment I tell them THEY need to shift current practices, THEY need to engage personally, because social media is tactile and it’s about THEM. And in doing so, they need to be ready for anything. But very few are ready to hear the truth of best practice in social media.

The most common reaction I get is the age-old blank, silent ‘you have no idea what you’re talking about, I can’t possibly do that’ look of horror. They’re the ones you can’t help – yet. But rest assured, they’ll come knocking in about 6 – 12 months (maybe less) wanting to take the plunge and for you to hold their hand. That’s a good thing, they’ve had the critical shift in mindset: from observation to a considered willingness moving towards participation.

It’s hard to remember sometimes that nearly half of the Australian population do not know life without a mobile telephone…so for them, social media is about as strenuous a jump now, as what Atari to VCR was in the 80’s.

Mobile telephony and consumer communications are ubiquitous. What was once achieved with a full-page ad in the sunday papers, now needs to be re-purposed for iPad, iPhone, Blackberry just to ensure the target consumers have the chance (not guaranteed distribution) of engaging with your diligently crafted creative. Then in order to get positive Word Of Mouth (which SM does not guarantee), you need to Tweet, facebook, myspace, blog, retweet and Digg, in the interests of starting (or hopefully continuing) the desired brand and business conversation.

Marketing and Communications practices need to change in order to maximise the potential of new media technologies. It’s a bit like driving a car with stability control switched off because you already know how to drive; or outsourcing your call centre without conducting product training or considering systems management processes. It just kind of exists without adding tangible and measurable value intrinsically to your brand and your business.

Ceding control is confronting. It’s against every marketing and sales principle worth engaging. That was of course, until the arrival of social media capability.

Knowing if, when and how to cede control is the key to getting cut through within the savvy new media consumer sphere.

So is Social Media hype or part of a Communications Revolution? Neither, merely part of the evolution of 21st century communications.

A quick video to explain…

http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=10032646&server=vimeo.com&show_title=1&show_byline=1&show_portrait=1&color=&fullscreen=1&autoplay=0&loop=0

Social Media from Phil Guest on Vimeo.

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