Is Email the Darth Vader of Modern Business Communications?

In a world where instant communications and engagement is rapidly becoming the norm, email is taking on all the traits of a dark lord in the making.

Email started out as a powerful and useful tool that brought speed and (for the most part) brevity to industrial and corporate communications. However, it is rapidly transforming into the disgruntled jedi of communications.

Email is a dark art of the new wee. A 1.0 workplace solution. A habitual norm. Administratively heavy, it sucks previous time and resources from your everyday.

and yet… for all its operational inefficiencies it still seems to work for the majority.

Mobility has ensured access to the dark lord of ICT communications. Smartphones have ensured access to webmail a standard… in effect minimising the mobile digital divide, by giving cross-generational comfort on these new platforms and devices.

In this form, email is the connector. The access point for new media platforms and devices.

Convergence can only occur where comfort resides.

For the first decade of ‘social’ it has been email, but what’s next…? 

What’s able to fill the void? Is SMS or IM enough? or is non-regulation the biggest obstacle here…?

Non-regulation, poor regulation and the non-specific zones of the internet environment are our biggest foes.

Not just for business, but for governments and citizens as well.

There are no robust legal structures in place that currently nurture nor protect the individual online, let alone small business.

In over a decade there has been very little movement towards reform as monetising the internet remains the priority.

LinkedIn – the largest professional network where people have been putting their personal information for free for the last decade is now owned by a multinational corporation in Microsoft.

I find it strange that no one is questioning the personal cost of such a merger… perhaps for the majority of us, we’re not switching on to the reality of the evolution of the social networking platform that profiled, connected and enabled market transfers in human terms…. at what cost are we willing to earn a buck?

Let’s hope someday in the not too distant future we all start thinking about and directly addressing the cost of how we ‘settle’ the wild west of the internet.

What are we really willing to relinquish in order to earn a buck?

If so, what is the true cost to the individual, team or organisation… society?

Sadly, it’s a question very few are willing to articulate, let alone address with a view to answering

Why?

Because in order to do so, we’d have to acknowledge and address not only email as the Dark Lord of the internet, but the deeper, now embedded commercial practices of digital decadence and the new norm of dumbing down and relaxing acceptable standards of entertainment, operations and performance.

Let’s stop being happy with average and strive for great and the impossible again.

 

 

‘Tis the Season for Christmas Ads

In the US Super Bowl advertising can make and break careers.

In the UK, the advertising heavyweights concentrate their efforts (and a large percentage of spend) on Christmas.

This year Marks & Spencer (or M&S as it is more commonly referred) released their contribution to the corporate advertising ‘Christmas cheer’… and it’s an absolute winner.

Not only is it beautifully shot, its originality is decidedly refreshing… and VERY clever.

Don’t take my word for it though, judge for yourselves… and enjoy:

#UrWelcome

Introducing Bert…

I just found this in the archives and rediscovered the joys of the telecommunications disconnect between hardware and the Australian data service network…

So imagine my surprise when wrapped up in all white – looking pretty schmiko too – I am unceremoniously thrown into a cardboard box and thrown about in the back of a van before being left on a chilly doorstep.

Finally placed on a busy kitchen bench I eagerly await the arrival of my new designated owner. It’s 4pm and no sign of those noisy little people, so icons crossed, I haven’t arrived in one of those loud, busy and complex houses with kids.  Three hours later, I light up with joy as I hear: “Tiff, There’s a package for you on the bench”.

First I hear the eager tear of cardboard before finally being wrapped adoringly in the warm embrace of a delicate hand.

Seventy-two hours later however, things have turned pear-shaped and I have gone from being the adored iPhone4 to Bert.

Why Bert, I hear you ask…?

Because for the past 72 hours whenever Tiff has asked me to do something that actually requires using the cellular data network, 9 times out of 10, I can’t help but roll my icons sideways (she hasn’t found my voice control function yet) as I try to communicate as best as my interface will allow to let her know, I know what she wants me to do and where she wants to go BERT NO SERVICE!

If only humans spoke iPhone…