A commonly posed question, worthy of a universal and definitive answer.
However, media is not always comprehensively or easily defined.

Research would suggest that the context of definition, significantly impacts how the term media is defined. For instance, a public relations practitioner will group various mass and niche communications technologies and businesses into ‘target media channels’. Whereas an advertiser and media planner will define ‘media types or categories’, such as print, broadcast, outdoor, online, with a view to creating target channels for campaigns.

But how can you define a term by using a term?

I guess it comes down to whether it is a noun or an adjective.

These are just some of the definitions proposed for media. Which one do you think is best?

These aren’t academic explanations, obviously, but they are invaluable for students new to the study of media.
Why?
Because a quick google/ online search enables students to ask the most basic of questions and potentially find an answer that enables them to access the concept and look for further content.
I encourage all of my students to start at the very beginning. Break down the keywords in any question or assigned task and ‘enter’ the project as comfortably as they can.
Task for this week:
What is the difference between traditional, new and online media?

By Tiffanny Junee

Tiffanny has a background in strategic integrated marketing and media communications. Her most recent projects include: Digital Media Academy - a 24/7 personal digital mentor @home @work @school @play Our School Online - a social justice start up embedding equity into the new NSW curriculum. Tiffanny lectures in Social Marketing, Crisis Communications, Social Issues Marketing and Leadership Communications @SydneyUni. A former editor and rugby union journalist, Tiffanny is always writing. Her current multi-platform projects include Australian-based generational thriller 'The Point' (think Thorn birds meets Mission Impossible).